This reductionism prevents us from learning the human stories behind the ideas”

Judy Wu Dominick for Christianity Today:

[We] admitted our tendency to recognize other people’s tribalism but less often our own. Consequently, we realized that we accuse our ideological opponents of dehumanizing vitriol while feeling perfectly justified in dehumanizing and abusing them. We also acknowledged our tendency to equate people with their ideas. This reductionism prevents us from learning the human stories behind the ideas—and when we don’t apply effort to learning those stories, we fail to become instruments of healing, justice, and reconciliation.


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October 26, 2017 · church · culture · reconciliation · politics · polarization · tribalism · Judy Wu Dominick · Christianity Today

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