Elections and why cities vote the way they do

Richard Florida in a February 2013 piece:

America’s political divide is an outgrowth of its increasingly divided economic landscape. The very same forces of talent-clustering and knowledge industry concentration that shape the divergent economic fortunes of our cities and regions, increasingly shape our politics.

In short, cities tend to vote democratic. (Florida cites some of the reasons why, like education and the kinds of jobs people have.)


Florida in a piece this week:

But the bigger reality [regarding the post-election narrative] according to my own analysis is that the 2016 election follows the same basic contours of class and location — the same divides of knowledge and density — of the last several election cycles.

In short, cities tend to vote democratic.


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November 18, 2016 · city · election · culture · richard florida · divided · city lab

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